top of page

D&D Villain Team Ideas- How to create a campaign from bad guys





In D&D or any other role play game, some really exciting possibilities lie in the interplay between different villains, especially if they are D&D or RPG villains with different power levels, objectives or beliefs.


A coalition of bad actors might come together to carry out a plan of conquest, sometimes with connections to the players, or you might create a hierarchy, where henchmen villains serve a boss.


You might even create a situation where some villains are at war with others and the PCs find themselves in the crossfire and even have to ally with one side or another in order to survive.


This in turn could lead to some very interesting outcomes as one side in the civil war either triumphs or is able to extract certain concessions from the heroes in return for their help.


The Villain Hierarchy

Creating a complex villain hierarchy in D&D or any other role-playing game can add a lot of depth and intrigue to your campaign.


A villain hierarchy refers to the different levels of power and influence within a villainous organization, with each level being occupied by a different villain or group of villains.

One way to build a villain hierarchy is to have a "big bad" at the top, who serves as the main antagonist of the campaign.

This could be a powerful sorcerer, a ruthless crime lord, or a malevolent demon. The big bad is the ultimate goal for the players to defeat and serves as the primary driving force behind the campaign.

Beneath the big bad, you can have a number of "lieutenants" who serve as the main adversaries for the players.

These villains might be the leaders of different factions within the organization, or they might have different specializations such as assassins, necromancers, or warlocks.

They could also be different races such as dragon, demon, or other creatures that are powerful and have a specific abilities.

These lieutenants provide the players with challenging and varied opponents to fight against, and they can also serve as potential allies or informants if the players are able to defeat or capture them.

At the next level, you can have "henchmen" villains who serve as the minions of the higher-ranking villains.

These could be groups of bandits, cultists, or other low-level enemies that the players will encounter on a regular basis. They can also serve as cannon fodder for the players to practice their combat skills on.

Finally, you can include "foot soldiers" who are the most basic level of the hierarchy and serve as the grunts of the organization.

These could be low-level monsters, hired thugs, or other low-powered enemies that the players will encounter frequently.

It is also important to consider the relationship between the different levels of the hierarchy. The higher-ranking villains should have some level of control over the lower-ranking ones, and they should be able to call upon them for aid or reinforcements if necessary.

However, there should also be opportunities for the lower-ranking villains to challenge or even overthrow their superiors if they are able to gain enough power or support.

This can create interesting opportunities for the players to exploit or even create factions within the villain organization.

Creating a complex villain hierarchy allows for a variety of different challenges and opportunities for the players. It also allows for a deeper and more nuanced narrative, as the players will have to navigate the different levels of the hierarchy in order to defeat the big bad and save the day.

Additionally, it also gives the players the opportunity to work their way up the hierarchy, taking down the lieutenants and henchmen before finally reaching the top.

The villain hierarchy can also be used to create a sense of escalation, as the players will encounter increasingly powerful and dangerous enemies as they work their way up the hierarchy.

Creating a complex villain hierarchy in your role-playing game can add a lot of depth and intrigue to your campaign. It allows for a variety of different challenges and opportunities for the players, as well as a deeper and more nuanced narrative.

It also allows the players to work their way up the hierarchy and encounter increasingly powerful and dangerous enemies as they progress.


Villain Coalitions

Building a villainous coalition in D&D or any other role-playing game can add a new level of complexity and intrigue to your campaign.

A coalition refers to a group of villains who come together to achieve a common goal, often with each villain bringing their own unique abilities, resources, and motivations to the table.

One way to build a villainous coalition is to have a central villain, often referred to as the "mastermind," who serves as the leader and the primary driving force behind the coalition.

This villain could be a powerful sorcerer, a ruthless crime lord, or a malevolent demon who is seeking to gain ultimate power or control over the world.

The mastermind serves as the ultimate goal for the players to defeat, and the coalition serves as the primary driving force behind the campaign.

Beneath the mastermind, you can have a number of "partners," who are other powerful villains who have joined the coalition.

Each partner could have their own unique abilities, resources, and motivations for joining the coalition. For example, one partner might be a powerful warlord who is seeking to expand their territory, while another might be a powerful necromancer who is seeking to gain access to forbidden knowledge.

These partners provide the players with challenging and varied opponents to fight against, and they can also serve as potential allies or informants if the players are able to defeat or capture them.

In addition to partners, the coalition could also include "associates" who are lesser villains who have joined the coalition for various reasons.

They could be a group of bandits, cultists, or other low-level enemies that the players will encounter on a regular basis. They could also be a group of mercenaries or hired thugs who are working for the coalition.

It is important to consider the dynamics of the coalition when building it. The different villains should have different motivations for joining the coalition, and they should have different levels of power and influence within the coalition.

This can create interesting opportunities for the players to exploit or even create factions within the coalition.

The players might also have to navigate the different levels of the coalition in order to defeat the mastermind and save the day.

For example, they might have to defeat the partners before they can reach the mastermind, or they might have to ally with one partner in order to defeat another.

Additionally, the players might also have to deal with the associates, who could serve as a distraction or as a way to gain information about the coalition.

Creating a villainous coalition allows for a variety of different challenges and opportunities for the players.

It also allows for a deeper and more nuanced narrative, as the players will have to navigate the dif